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The Easiest Way To Get a Vietnam Visa 🛂
HOW TO GET A TOURIST VISA FOR VIETNAM What is the fastest, easiest, and most trusted way to get your Vietnamese visa online? In this video I explain the difference between a Vietnam e-visa and a Vietnam visa on arrival and who needs which and why and I show online the exact process of how to get a visa for Vietnam and the various Visa options available. Visas for Vietnam can be a little complicated and confusing so this video is to make it a little easier for you to understand. For those who need to obtain a visa to enter Vietnam, VOA or visa on arrival is the usualy easiest and quickest way and I walk through the steps online with you.. Vietnam Visa on Arrival is an online way to obtain a visa to visit Vietnam. After completing the online application form and paying the processing fee, you will receive, via email, your Approval Letter from between one hour to two business days, depending on the status of visa processing you have selected. Just 3 steps to get Vietnam visa on arrival: 1. Fill out online form 2. Get Visa approval letter via email. 3. Get visa stamped at Vietnam arrival airport. Some online visa sites make the process a little more complicated than others and don't offer great support. That is why I recommend using http://www.vietnam-visa.com/a/vaff493032 Exclusive RetireCheap.Asia membership site - all the REAL life details you need to live in Thailand plus connect with other like minded people at: http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/ An electronic visa (E-visa) is one of visa types issued to foreigners by Vietnamese Immigration Department via electronic system. Vietnam E-visa It can be used once (single entry) and is valid for no longer than 30 days. E-visas will be issued by the immigration authority via digital transactions for foreigners wanting to enter Vietnam.

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 21 January 2018
Fourth Conversation with World Traveler, Sculptor / Part Time Chiang Mai Resident Jim McNalis
It's always great to sit down and have a conversation with friend and sculptor, Jim McNalis. In fact I have recorded our conversations on three prior occasions and shared them with you on You Tube. We always have great conversations and the previous ones received such great feedback I decided to record another of our conversations. So listen along because we usually share some interesting viewpoints on some unique topics that you might not hear discussed on the street. This time we talk about traveling and what holds people back from exploring this fascinating world we live in. We also touch on a surgery Jim had in Chiang Mai and how he feels about the medical care and treatment in Thailand. Check out our awesome site with all the details you need to know and networking with members moving to Thailand or already living here! http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 Please become a friend or subscribe to this channel and you if can, link back to my website I’d appreciate it. For more videos, books on retiring abroad and a Retirement Budget Calculator go check out http://retirecheap.asia

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 16 January 2018
Happy New Year - Thanks for 7 Million Views! 🎆
Our RetirecheapJC YouTube channel has now been in existence about seven years. Well, we just hit 7 million views. What an accomplishment! Exclusive RetireCheap.Asia membership site - all the REAL life details you need to live in Thailand plus connect with other like minded people at: http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 I just wanted to reach out and thank all our loyal YouTube viewers for giving us all the encouragement and support over the years. Thank you so much for the 7 million views. I also want to wish all our viewers a HAPPY New Year and a 2018 filled with lots of love and laughter. Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 09 January 2018
TImyT 038 - Camping In Northern Thailand 2017 🌠 Part 3
A cool thing to do in Thailand is to camp in national park campgrounds. There are over 120 Thai national parks most of which have large campgrounds with toilets, showers and washrooms, some are more well maintained than others. In part 3 we visit Doi Ang Khang 1,900m elevation on the Burmese-Thai border and Si Lanna National Park which is the is the eighth largest national park in Thailand and home to wildlife animals, waterfalls, caves and springs and borders Mae Ngat Dam and reservoir. Exclusive RetireCheap.Asia membership site - all the REAL life details you need to live in Thailand plus connect with other like minded people at: http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 Camping in Thailand is a great source of adventure and relaxation. The cool winters and rich landscapes provide the perfect combinationfor outdoor enthusiasts who like to sleep under the stars and get close to nature. It has always surprised me that with RIPpers (Retirees In Paradise) it isn't really that popular. Most retirees head straight for the southern beaches or cultural cities of the north missing out on fantastic camping opportunities all over the country. A two or three night stay in one of Thailand’s national parks is a great way to experience the fantastic landscapes and nature on offer in Thailand. National parks are staffed by park rangers and they are on duty 24 hours a day and can assist you if you have any problems. They also point out the main tourist attractions in the area and can be hired as guides if you fancy trekking out into the wilderness. Camping equipment such as tents, sleeping bags, mats, pillows, and kerosene lamps can be hired from most park headquarters for a minimal cost. A two man tent can be rented for a night for about 150 Baht, sleeping bags and other accessories range from 10 Baht to 30 Baht per item. The entry fee for Thai National Parks varies from 100-500 Baht for foreigners depending on the park. The more popular parks tend to charge higher amounts but the quieter, less frequented parks charge less. And as long as you keep your entrance ticket you only pay once no matter how long you stay in the park. Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/ The best time of year for camping in Thailand is the cooler months from November to March. This is the driest and coolest time of the year, but for some it might still be a little warm. The only places that get really cool are high up in the mountains in northern Thailand in places such as the highest mountain in Thailand, Doi Inthanon National Park. So we are excited to take you along with us on our 2017 Winter Camping Tour so sitback enjoy the videos and if you have any other questions leave them in the comment. If you like what were doing give us a thumbs up and subscribe! Remember, there's always an option! This video features the songs “Green Leaf Stomp” by Topher Mohr and Alex Elena from the YouTube music library and Airport Lounge - Disco Ultralounge by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100806 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ and Gymnopedie No 2 by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100786 Artist: http://incompetech.com/

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 04 January 2018
TImyT 037 - Camping In Northern Thailand 2017 ⛺ Part 2
A cool thing to do in Thailand is to camp in national park campgrounds. There are over 120 Thai national parks most of which have large campgrounds with toilets, showers and washrooms, some are more well maintained than others. In part 2 we visit Phu Samur Dao - Mountain Same the Stars! Gorgeous view! And Doi Phu Nang National Park which has rolling mountain ranges covered in lush forests are home to a variety of fauna such as soft-shelled turtles, monitor lizards and peacocks AND incredible waterfalls! Exclusive RetireCheap.Asia membership site - all the REAL life details you need to live in Thailand plus connect with other like minded people at: http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 Camping in Thailand is a great source of adventure and relaxation. The cool winters and rich landscapes provide the perfect combinationfor outdoor enthusiasts who like to sleep under the stars and get close to nature. It has always surprised me that with RIPpers (Retirees In Paradise) it isn't really that popular. Most retirees head straight for the southern beaches or cultural cities of the north missing out on fantastic camping opportunities all over the country. A two or three night stay in one of Thailand’s national parks is a great way to experience the fantastic landscapes and nature on offer in Thailand. National parks are staffed by park rangers and they are on duty 24 hours a day and can assist you if you have any problems. They also point out the main tourist attractions in the area and can be hired as guides if you fancy trekking out into the wilderness. Camping equipment such as tents, sleeping bags, mats, pillows, and kerosene lamps can be hired from most park headquarters for a minimal cost. A two man tent can be rented for a night for about 150 Baht, sleeping bags and other accessories range from 10 Baht to 30 Baht per item. The entry fee for Thai National Parks varies from 100-500 Baht for foreigners depending on the park. The more popular parks tend to charge higher amounts but the quieter, less frequented parks charge less. And as long as you keep your entrance ticket you only pay once no matter how long you stay in the park. Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/ The best time of year for camping in Thailand is the cooler months from November to March. This is the driest and coolest time of the year, but for some it might still be a little warm. The only places that get really cool are high up in the mountains in northern Thailand in places such as the highest mountain in Thailand, Doi Inthanon National Park. So we are excited to take you along with us on our 2017 Winter Camping Tour so sitback enjoy the videos and if you have any other questions leave them in the comment. If you like what were doing give us a thumbs up and subscribe! Remember, there's always an option! This video features the songs “Soul Groove” by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/ and "Ticker" by Silent Partner from the YouTube music library and "Dusty Road" by the Jingle Punks from the YouTube music library

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 21 December 2017
TImyT 036 - Camping In Northern Thailand 2017 ⛺ Part 1
A cool thing to do in Thailand is to camp in national park campgrounds. There are over 120 Thai national parks most of which have large campgrounds with toilets, showers and washrooms, some are more well maintained than others. Exclusive RetireCheap.Asia membership site - all the REAL life details you need to live in Thailand plus connect with other like minded people at: http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 Camping in Thailand is a great source of adventure and relaxation. The cool winters and rich landscapes provide the perfect combinationfor outdoor enthusiasts who like to sleep under the stars and get close to nature. It has always surprised me that with RIPpers (Retirees In Paradise) it isn't really that popular. Most retirees head straight for the southern beaches or cultural cities of the north missing out on fantastic camping opportunities all over the country. A two or three night stay in one of Thailand’s national parks is a great way to experience the fantastic landscapes and nature on offer in Thailand. National parks are staffed by park rangers and they are on duty 24 hours a day and can assist you if you have any problems. They also point out the main tourist attractions in the area and can be hired as guides if you fancy trekking out into the wilderness. Camping equipment such as tents, sleeping bags, mats, pillows, and kerosene lamps can be hired from most park headquarters for a minimal cost. A two man tent can be rented for a night for about 150 Baht, sleeping bags and other accessories range from 10 Baht to 30 Baht per item. The entry fee for Thai National Parks varies from 100-500 Baht for foreigners depending on the park. The more popular parks tend to charge higher amounts but the quieter, less frequented parks charge less. And as long as you keep your entrance ticket you only pay once no matter how long you stay in the park. Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/ The best time of year for camping in Thailand is the cooler months from November to March. This is the driest and coolest time of the year, but for some it might still be a little warm. The only places that get really cool are high up in the mountains in northern Thailand in places such as the highest mountain in Thailand, Doi Inthanon National Park. So we are excited to take you along with us on our 2017 Winter Camping Tour so sitback enjoy the videos and if you have any other questions leave them in the comment. If you like what were doing give us a thumbs up and subscribe! Remember, there's always an option! This video features the song “Rural Stride” by Josh Kirsch; Media Right Productions from the YouTube music library and Feather Waltz by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100658 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ and Dusty Road by the Jingle Punks from the YouTube music library

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 11 December 2017
TImyT 035 - Process of Getting a New US Passport 🛂
The ACS (American Citizen Services) section of U.S. Embassy Bangkok and the U.S. Consulate General in Chiang Mai can issue full-validity and limited-validity U.S. passports by appointment when you have the need for a new passport. Exclusive RetireCheap.Asia membership site - all the REAL life details you need to live in Thailand plus connect with other like minded people at: http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 During that series of seven videos about Isaan and building the house I got asked quite a few questions. Some of these questions I got a chance to answer and others I didn't. So I thought I'd sit down with Nat and take out a bunch that I thought might be relevant to a lot of you out there watching these videos and answer them for you. I hope you find the information useful and entertaining. As you know I've been living in Thailand for over 17 years and during that time have resided in quite a few places. I've gone through most of the things most people experience either just coming over or living here over a period of time. I always like to share my experience so RIPpers (Retirees in Paradise) don't have to reinvent the wheel and I can smooth out the learning curve for you all. In fact our whole member site is based on that. Any possible question is answered in full detail along with an incredible group of people that support each other before during and after their journey to their new home in Thailand.You might balk about the price but the price is the same in Thailand as it is when done in the US. It's set by Department Of State. You can pay in USD's or Thai Baht, but the exchange rate is set by the feds and doesn't change daily. You can do the math on the day you apply (which is the day you pay the fee) to see which way works out better for you. For Americans using the US Embassy it's no longer a walk-in transaction. Except if it is an emergency you must make an appointment to do any new applications or renewals. Appointments are usually obtainable in one to three days. When you do a renewal here, you DO get your old passport back, but it will be ivalidated indicating that it's old and unusable. If you need to get any Thai Immigration stamps transferred from your now-old passport to your new passport, the Embassy or Consulate will give you a letter indicating why you need the stamps transferred. This is only for Thai immigration stamps. Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/ It takes several weeks to get your new passport back as the passport itself comes from the US via embassy courier. Only limited term, emergency issued and Official passports are produced locally in Bangkok. All others come from the National Passport Center and are forwarded to the Embassy to be collected. Don't worry about not having a passport while in this process. You will get a receipt as evidence of your application and fee payment. If you can't come to get it in person, you can send someone else, but they must have a signed note of authorization to receive it. No appointment is necessary for pick-ups. Overall, it's very much like doing it in the US at one of the Passport Offices. This video features the song “Safety Net” by Riot and “If I Had a Chicken” by Kevin MacLeod from the YouTube music library.

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 04 December 2017
TImyT 034 - A Lot to be Thankful For 🙏
Happy Thankgiving Thailand style. From our family to yours we want to say to everyone how grateful we are for your viewership and support. We hope you also have a lot to be thankful for in your lives. OK now time to eat!!! Exclusive RetireCheap.Asia membership site - all the REAL life details you need to live in Thailand plus connect with other like minded people at: http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 23 November 2017
Tropical storm Kirogi floods Cha Am/Hua Hin Nov 2017 ⛈
Just Chillin’ 002 - Overnight rain caused by tropical depression “Kirogi” has wreaked havoc in seaside districts of Cha-am and Hua Hin(Nov 21). Exclusive RetireCheap.Asia membership site - all the REAL life details you need to live in Thailand plus connect with other like minded people at: http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 The storm has brought heavy rain in Hua Hin and Cha-am submerging several roads in both towns, and forcing several schools to close due to high flood levels. The heavy rains have forced local authorities to mobilise water pumps to drain flood water from business and residential areas of the town. Many areas of Phetkasem highway, which passes through the towns, is under almost 20 centimetres of water. The Thai Meteorological Department issued a warning of possible flash flood in 14 provinces as the low-pressure system, which now covers the upper South, is forecast to move to the Andaman Sea. The low-pressure system will bring more rain over the lower Central, the East, and the upper South while isolated heavy rain is expected in the lower Central and the upper South. Residents should beware of possible flash floods. Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 21 November 2017
Just Chillin’ 001 Thanksgiving in Thailand 🍃
November is a gerat time to visit Thailand. Precipitation and humidity levels are at their lowest in November. The north will be very comfortable, warm during day with cool nights with the south and islands cooler than the hot months. The hotel rates are moderate but it starts the high season. Exclusive RetireCheap.Asia membership site - all the REAL life details you need to live in Thailand plus connect with other like minded people at: http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 It is also the month that has the celebration of Loy Krathong which is a festival where people make or buy little baskets made of banana leaf which have beautiful flower decorations, joss sticks and candles ontop. These are floated in the river after praying for your sins to be forgiven. It is a beautiful sight when hundreds of these can be seen bobbing along on the waves with their candles alight. What some don't resalize though is that some expats visiting from the States or living in Thailand with their spouses also celebrate Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving is a US holiday and not really celebrated many other places to my knowledge. It is business as usual in Thailand. But more and more in the bigger cities restarants can be found having special Thanksgiving meals and stores selling products to make a Thanksgiving dinner. For me that's the ticket! I will be making and eating a great Thanksgiving diner. Why? Because I have so much to be thankful for! Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 20 November 2017
TImyT 033 Q&A Life in Thailand / Isaan
Do you have questions about retiring and living in Thailand? Well, if you been following our YouTube channel retirecheapJC you'll know we just finished up a whole series about living in Isaan and the costs associated with living there and building a house. Retirement in Isaan Thailand might be a great option for some of you. But I'm sure you have questions. Exclusive RetireCheap.Asia membership site - all the REAL life details you need to live in Thailand plus connect with other like minded people at: http://goo.gl/M0nMT5 During that series of seven videos about Isaan and building the house I got asked quite a few questions. Some of these questions I got a chance to answer and others I didn't. So I thought I'd sit down with Nat and take out a bunch that I thought might be relevant to a lot of you out there watching these videos and answer them for you. I hope you find the information useful and entertaining. As you know I've been living in Thailand for over 17 years and during that time have resided in quite a few places. I've gone through most of the things most people experience either just coming over or living here over a period of time. I always like to share my experience so RIPpers (Retirees in Paradise) don't have to reinvent the wheel and I can smooth out the learning curve for you all. In fact our whole member site is based on that. Any possible question is answered in full detail along with an incredible group of people that support each other before during and after their journey to their new home in Thailand. Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/ Anyway setback enjoy the video and if you have any other questions leave them in the comment. If you like what were doing give us a thumbs up and subscribe! Remember, there's always an option!

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 15 November 2017
TImyT 032 Life and Costs in Isaan Thailand Pt 7
In part seven of Life and Costs in Isaan we’re going to let you see our finished Thai house. The final costs came in at about $12,000 USD. I told Nat when we started I thought we could build it for about 350,000 Thai Baht so I was pretty close. And that was with my 3 months of rent (about $530 USD) and other expenses included! Come take a look! Surrounded by mountains and comprised of mostly farms, Isaan is the biggest region in Thailand. It is an ideal destination for those wanting to get back to nature. I call it the “real” Thailand. Prices in Isaan are inexpensive and the people are some of the friendliest people in the world. Become a member! https://goo.gl/M0nMT5 Nat comes from a very small place outside of a small town called Nong Hong in Buriram province. We are spending some time here to build Nat's parents a small home in the meantime we'll be getting to know the way the Isaan people live. Isaan is the North-East region of Thailand and some of the big name destinations are Udon Thani, Khon Kaen, Khorat, Nong Khai, and Surin. In Isaan the native language not that much different from the language they speak in Laos. It is mostly a dialect that consists of a mixture of Thai and the Laotian languages. In Isaan it is mostly farms that grow rice and where we are they also grow sugar cane and sweet potatoes. The culture and society of the Isaan people is very close to that of Laos. Even to this day the Lao culture and Isaan language is still very predominant throughout the Isaan region but learning the normal Thai language at school is a requirement. We will be spending time in a moo-Baan (village) which is about one hour west of the city of Buriram. Once you leave the paved highway the secondary roads become less maintained. Most of these secondary roads will be paved but once you turn off of them you end up on dirt roads. Some of these roads have so many potholes you cannot avoid them. Small vehicles struggle just to get down these roads. On many of the farms people live in small huts made of scrap wood and bamboo. These are much better than the little temporary shelters that they have set up in the fields for when they are working on the farm. Most people get around on small motorcycles, some of which uneven license, so larger Petrol (gas) Stations are not required. Usually there's just a pump or two set up to service the motorbikes and farm vehicles. Many houses you will see that they are all very run down and consist of minimal materials. Some people will live in what appears to be a tin shed while others have managed to construct a small dwelling with 4 block walls and a tin roof. The house were building for Nat's parents will be made of concrete walls, aluminum windows and a drop ceiling. But many of the local houses are open-aired so many of the local critters will often drop in. Mosquitoes are a big problem in these areas as they can be carriers of malaria and many other diseases so the people usually sleep under mosquito nets. Prior to building the house we have already built an exterior kitchen and put in a new well. We also built a new bathroom which is where they also shower. It is very common for the shower/bathroom to be a room external to the house. There is no pressure in the water system so there isn't a traditional shower with the shower head. The shower consists of a large bucket full of water with a smaller container to pour/splash water on yourself, the water is at room temperature or cooler during the winter season. Property boundaries here are very different in the village than in the city. There are no fences and no one is worried about other people or animals coming on to their property. So most the time you will see buffaloes and cows roaming around grazing on other people's property. Many people out here in Isaan raise cows, pigs, chickens and ducks which, as well as being pets, later become their source of protein. Eating is a social event and a very big part of the Isaan people's lives. You will constantly hear people say, "maa gin khaow (Come Eat)", summoning you to come eat with them. For most people living in Isaan eating is done sitting on the floor with everybody sitting surrounding the food in the middle. If you are looking for a place to live a peaceful and serene expatriat lifestyle, you will be delighted by Isaan's lush paddy fields, as well as its charming people. So come join us while I give you a brief tour of this part of Thailand and show you what it costs to build a small house in Isaan. Please like or subscribe to this channel and you if can, link back to my website, I’d appreciate it. For more videos, books on retiring abroad and a Retirement Budget Calculator go check out http://retirecheap.asia Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 31 October 2017
TImyT 031 Life and Costs in Isaan Thailand Pt 6 👓
In part six of Life and Costs in Isaan we’re going to get you up to date on our Thai house construction with the current costs, another RIPper Mobile repair, a ridiculously cheap reading glasses repair and another delicious fuit you might not have tasted. Surrounded by mountains and comprised of mostly farms, Isaan is the biggest region in Thailand. It is an ideal destination for those wanting to get back to nature. I call it the “real” Thailand. Prices in Isaan are inexpensive and the people are some of the friendliest people in the world. Become a member! https://goo.gl/M0nMT5 Nat comes from a very small place outside of a small town called Nong Hong in Buriram province. We are spending some time here to build Nat's parents a small home in the meantime we'll be getting to know the way the Isaan people live. Isaan is the North-East region of Thailand and some of the big name destinations are Udon Thani, Khon Kaen, Khorat, Nong Khai, and Surin. In Isaan the native language not that much different from the language they speak in Laos. It is mostly a dialect that consists of a mixture of Thai and the Laotian languages. In Isaan it is mostly farms that grow rice and where we are they also grow sugar cane and sweet potatoes. The culture and society of the Isaan people is very close to that of Laos. Even to this day the Lao culture and Isaan language is still very predominant throughout the Isaan region but learning the normal Thai language at school is a requirement. We will be spending time in a moo-Baan (village) which is about one hour west of the city of Buriram. Once you leave the paved highway the secondary roads become less maintained. Most of these secondary roads will be paved but once you turn off of them you end up on dirt roads. Some of these roads have so many potholes you cannot avoid them. Small vehicles struggle just to get down these roads. On many of the farms people live in small huts made of scrap wood and bamboo. These are much better than the little temporary shelters that they have set up in the fields for when they are working on the farm. Most people get around on small motorcycles, some of which uneven license, so larger Petrol (gas) Stations are not required. Usually there's just a pump or two set up to service the motorbikes and farm vehicles. Many houses you will see that they are all very run down and consist of minimal materials. Some people will live in what appears to be a tin shed while others have managed to construct a small dwelling with 4 block walls and a tin roof. The house were building for Nat's parents will be made of concrete walls, aluminum windows and a drop ceiling. But many of the local houses are open-aired so many of the local critters will often drop in. Mosquitoes are a big problem in these areas as they can be carriers of malaria and many other diseases so the people usually sleep under mosquito nets. Prior to building the house we have already built an exterior kitchen and put in a new well. We also built a new bathroom which is where they also shower. It is very common for the shower/bathroom to be a room external to the house. There is no pressure in the water system so there isn't a traditional shower with the shower head. The shower consists of a large bucket full of water with a smaller container to pour/splash water on yourself, the water is at room temperature or cooler during the winter season. Property boundaries here are very different in the village than in the city. There are no fences and no one is worried about other people or animals coming on to their property. So most the time you will see buffaloes and cows roaming around grazing on other people's property. Many people out here in Isaan raise cows, pigs, chickens and ducks which, as well as being pets, later become their source of protein. Eating is a social event and a very big part of the Isaan people's lives. You will constantly hear people say, "maa gin khaow (Come Eat)", summoning you to come eat with them. For most people living in Isaan eating is done sitting on the floor with everybody sitting surrounding the food in the middle. If you are looking for a place to live a peaceful and serene expatriat lifestyle, you will be delighted by Isaan's lush paddy fields, as well as its charming people. So come join us while I give you a brief tour of this part of Thailand and show you what it costs to build a small house in Isaan. Please like or subscribe to this channel and you if can, link back to my website, I’d appreciate it. For more videos, books on retiring abroad and a Retirement Budget Calculator go check out http://retirecheap.asia Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 19 October 2017
TImyT 030 Life and Costs in Isaan Thailand Pt 5 💲
In part five of Life and Costs in Isaan we’re going to talk about modern Thai house construction, a ridiculously cheap RIPper Mobile repair and a delicious fuit you probably don’t know exists! Surrounded by mountains and comprised of mostly farms, Isaan is the biggest region in Thailand. It is an ideal destination for those wanting to get back to nature. I call it the “real” Thailand. Prices in Isaan are inexpensive and the people are some of the friendliest people in the world. Become a member! https://goo.gl/M0nMT5 Nat comes from a very small place outside of a small town called Nong Hong in Buriram province. We are spending some time here to build Nat's parents a small home in the meantime we'll be getting to know the way the Isaan people live. Isaan is the North-East region of Thailand and some of the big name destinations are Udon Thani, Khon Kaen, Khorat, Nong Khai, and Surin. In Isaan the native language not that much different from the language they speak in Laos. It is mostly a dialect that consists of a mixture of Thai and the Laotian languages. In Isaan it is mostly farms that grow rice and where we are they also grow sugar cane and sweet potatoes. The culture and society of the Isaan people is very close to that of Laos. Even to this day the Lao culture and Isaan language is still very predominant throughout the Isaan region but learning the normal Thai language at school is a requirement. We will be spending time in a moo-Baan (village) which is about one hour west of the city of Buriram. Once you leave the paved highway the secondary roads become less maintained. Most of these secondary roads will be paved but once you turn off of them you end up on dirt roads. Some of these roads have so many potholes you cannot avoid them. Small vehicles struggle just to get down these roads. On many of the farms people live in small huts made of scrap wood and bamboo. These are much better than the little temporary shelters that they have set up in the fields for when they are working on the farm. Most people get around on small motorcycles, some of which uneven license, so larger Petrol (gas) Stations are not required. Usually there's just a pump or two set up to service the motorbikes and farm vehicles. Many houses you will see that they are all very run down and consist of minimal materials. Some people will live in what appears to be a tin shed while others have managed to construct a small dwelling with 4 block walls and a tin roof. The house were building for Nat's parents will be made of concrete walls, aluminum windows and a drop ceiling. But many of the local houses are open-aired so many of the local critters will often drop in. Mosquitoes are a big problem in these areas as they can be carriers of malaria and many other diseases so the people usually sleep under mosquito nets. Prior to building the house we have already built an exterior kitchen and put in a new well. We also built a new bathroom which is where they also shower. It is very common for the shower/bathroom to be a room external to the house. There is no pressure in the water system so there isn't a traditional shower with the shower head. The shower consists of a large bucket full of water with a smaller container to pour/splash water on yourself, the water is at room temperature or cooler during the winter season. Property boundaries here are very different in the village than in the city. There are no fences and no one is worried about other people or animals coming on to their property. So most the time you will see buffaloes and cows roaming around grazing on other people's property. Many people out here in Isaan raise cows, pigs, chickens and ducks which, as well as being pets, later become their source of protein. Eating is a social event and a very big part of the Isaan people's lives. You will constantly hear people say, "maa gin khaow (Come Eat)", summoning you to come eat with them. For most people living in Isaan eating is done sitting on the floor with everybody sitting surrounding the food in the middle. If you are looking for a place to live a peaceful and serene expatriat lifestyle, you will be delighted by Isaan's lush paddy fields, as well as its charming people. So come join us while I give you a brief tour of this part of Thailand and show you what it costs to build a small house in Isaan. Please like or subscribe to this channel and you if can, link back to my website, I’d appreciate it. For more videos, books on retiring abroad and a Retirement Budget Calculator go check out http://retirecheap.asia Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 03 October 2017
TImyT 029 Life and Costs in Isaan Thailand Pt 4 ☕
In part four of Life and Costs in Isaan we’re going to talk to a silk weaver, check out the smallest coffee shop ever and of course, eat some food! Surrounded by mountains and comprised of mostly farms, Isaan is the biggest region in Thailand. It is an ideal destination for those wanting to get back to nature. I call it the “real” Thailand. Prices in Isaan are inexpensive and the people are some of the friendliest people in the world. Become a member! https://goo.gl/M0nMT5 Nat comes from a very small place outside of a small town called Nong Hong in Buriram province. We are spending some time here to build Nat's parents a small home in the meantime we'll be getting to know the way the Isaan people live. Isaan is the North-East region of Thailand and some of the big name destinations are Udon Thani, Khon Kaen, Khorat, Nong Khai, and Surin. In Isaan the native language not that much different from the language they speak in Laos. It is mostly a dialect that consists of a mixture of Thai and the Laotian languages. In Isaan it is mostly farms that grow rice and where we are they also grow sugar cane and sweet potatoes. The culture and society of the Isaan people is very close to that of Laos. Even to this day the Lao culture and Isaan language is still very predominant throughout the Isaan region but learning the normal Thai language at school is a requirement. We will be spending time in a moo-Baan (village) which is about one hour west of the city of Buriram. Once you leave the paved highway the secondary roads become less maintained. Most of these secondary roads will be paved but once you turn off of them you end up on dirt roads. Some of these roads have so many potholes you cannot avoid them. Small vehicles struggle just to get down these roads. On many of the farms people live in small huts made of scrap wood and bamboo. These are much better than the little temporary shelters that they have set up in the fields for when they are working on the farm. Most people get around on small motorcycles, some of which uneven license, so larger Petrol (gas) Stations are not required. Usually there's just a pump or two set up to service the motorbikes and farm vehicles. Many houses you will see that they are all very run down and consist of minimal materials. Some people will live in what appears to be a tin shed while others have managed to construct a small dwelling with 4 block walls and a tin roof. The house were building for Nat's parents will be made of concrete walls, aluminum windows and a drop ceiling. But many of the local houses are open-aired so many of the local critters will often drop in. Mosquitoes are a big problem in these areas as they can be carriers of malaria and many other diseases so the people usually sleep under mosquito nets. Prior to building the house we have already built an exterior kitchen and put in a new well. We also built a new bathroom which is where they also shower. It is very common for the shower/bathroom to be a room external to the house. There is no pressure in the water system so there isn't a traditional shower with the shower head. The shower consists of a large bucket full of water with a smaller container to pour/splash water on yourself, the water is at room temperature or cooler during the winter season. Property boundaries here are very different in the village than in the city. There are no fences and no one is worried about other people or animals coming on to their property. So most the time you will see buffaloes and cows roaming around grazing on other people's property. Many people out here in Isaan raise cows, pigs, chickens and ducks which, as well as being pets, later become their source of protein. Eating is a social event and a very big part of the Isaan people's lives. You will constantly hear people say, "maa gin khaow (Come Eat)", summoning you to come eat with them. For most people living in Isaan eating is done sitting on the floor with everybody sitting surrounding the food in the middle. If you are looking for a place to live a peaceful and serene expatriat lifestyle, you will be delighted by Isaan's lush paddy fields, as well as its charming people. So come join us while I give you a brief tour of this part of Thailand and show you what it costs to build a small house in Isaan. Please like or subscribe to this channel and you if can, link back to my website, I’d appreciate it. For more videos, books on retiring abroad and a Retirement Budget Calculator go check out http://retirecheap.asia Check out the International Expat Moving Guide http://retirecheap.asia/jcs-makin-the-move-essential-checklist/

By : retirecheapjc     Added : 21 September 2017

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